Personal Injury

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Australian Court: air carrier not liable under Montreal for faint on board the aircraft

The plaintiff was a passenger on Emirates Flight EK 407 from Melbourne to Dubai departing Melbourne on the evening of 15 March 2015. Some hours into the flight, feeling nauseous shortly after the first meal service, she got up from her seat to go to the bathroom. At the bathroom doorway she fainted, fracturing her right ankle in the fall. She says that the reason for her faint was that she was dehydrated. Although she had asked for water on the plane it had not been provided. She sued the defendant seeking damages for her injuries.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Austrian Supreme Court: tour organiser can be liable for hotel accomodation provided by air carrier

The return flight of the plaintiff''s holiday package was cancelled and the air carrier rebooked the plaintiff for the following day. Complying with its respective obligation under Reg. (EC) 261/2004, the air carrier provided the plaintiff with hotel accomodation for the additional night. The plaintiff - a person of reduced mobility  - took a walk in the area close to the hotel where she tripped, fell down and was injured. She sued the tour organiser for compensation for pain and suffering.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Austrian Supreme Court: sporting operator not liable for banana boat accident

In August 2013, the plaintiff who spent his holidays at an Austrian lake booked a "banana boat ride" operated by the defendant. Before mounting the "banana", the participants were instructed that the banana was likely to capsize and they should cling on tight.  During the ride which was operated in an accurate manner and at reasonable speed the banana, indeed, capsized and the plaintiff was seriously injured on his head probably because he collided with another passenger's body.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Ontario: claim against Mexican hotel stayed for lack of jurisdiction

In the spring of 2006, the plaintiff, Angela Haufler, was injured while on vacation in Mexico with her mother, a friend, and the friend's mother. The injury occurred while she was participating in an all-terrain vehicle (“ATV”) excursion.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Austrian Supreme Court: tour operator liable for floatplane boarding accident

The plaintiff had booked a package to the Maldives with the defendant. The package included a transfer by floatplane from Malé to the island where the hotel was situated. Accorsing to the Operating Manual of the carrier, it is necessary to moor the floatplane with three ropes. The crew is required to stand at each side of the entrance in order to assist the passengers boarding the aircraft. When the plaintiff was about to board, despite some waves the floatplane was only moored with two ropes and only one member of the crew was standing next to the entrance.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Swiss Federal Court: tour organizer not liable for paraglider accident

The plaintiff who had had successfully completed his paragliding education in 2001,  in 2002 booked a paragliding package to Italy with defendant. After some flights with a paraglider classified as being of "good-natured" flight characteristics, he changed to a more demanding paraglider classified for experienced pilots. At the second attempt with this other paraglider, it collapsed at one side which led into a crash in which the plaintiff was severely injured.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

UK: Court of Appeal decides in broken glass door case

The case relates to an accident suffered by the plaintiff when on holiday in Barbados in September 2008. She had gone onto the balcony of her hotel room to read a book, closing
behind her the sliding glass balcony doors. When the telephone in her room rang a short time later, she got up from her chair and made to go back to the room, but she walked into

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Australia: hotel not liable for security guard

The appellant was a patron at the respondent Hotel on the night of 4 July 2008. The manager on duty that night formed the view the appellant was intoxicated, and after speaking with the Hotel's licensee, instructed a security guard to remove her from the premises. He did so by pulling the stool on which the appellant was seated out from underneath her. The appellant fell to the floor and was injured. The security guard was employed by a company called "Checkmate".

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Canada: passenger claim against government over implementation of safety management systems dismissed

Following the crash of a King Air 100 in which he was injured as a passenger, James Ratt brought a claim against a number of parties including the Candadian Minister of Transport and the Government on the grounds that their implementation of the safety management systems within the regime created by the Canadian Aviation Regulations created a lax regulatory environment that contributed to the circumstances of the crash. However, the court concluded that neither party owed the passenger a duty of care.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

UK: Birmingham County Court decides in broken glass door case

The Russell family booked a holiday package to Spain. At the time of booking they made clear that they were not seasoned travellers and specifically requested accommodation which was suitable for young children because they took along their 4 year old daughter. They were duly reassured. At the hotel they were allocated to a room with a glass balcony door. Shortly after arrival, while the parents were unpacking, the girl ran towards the door. She failed to realise that it was still shut and collided with it.

Pages

X