Liability

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

German Court: air carrier liable for allergic reaction to hot towel

In a recent judgement the Oberlandesgericht Frankfurt am Main held that an air carrier was liable for a passenger's allergic reaction to the hot towels distributed during the flight. In October 2010, the plaintiff traveled on a fligth from India to Germany. She told one of the flight attendants that the hot towels could cause an allergic reaction of her body and asked not to distribute these towels during the flight. Despite this request, the towels were distributed and the plaintiff suffered from a respiatory distress which required immediate medical treatment after landing.

Daniel Zim's picture

Waiver & Release Agreements Barred in Virginia but Still Very Useful for Travel Companies

Since the 19th Century, Virginia courts have maintained that waiver and release agreements for personal injuries violate public policy and are, therefore, prohibited in the Commonwealth.

Daniel Zim's picture

Waiver & Release Agreements Barred in Virginia but Still Very Useful for Travel Companies

Since the 19th Century, Virginia courts have maintained that waiver and release agreements for personal injuries violate public policy and are, therefore, prohibited in the Commonwealth.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Ontario: claim against Mexican hotel stayed for lack of jurisdiction

In the spring of 2006, the plaintiff, Angela Haufler, was injured while on vacation in Mexico with her mother, a friend, and the friend's mother. The injury occurred while she was participating in an all-terrain vehicle (“ATV”) excursion.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Austrian Supreme Court: tour operator liable for floatplane boarding accident

The plaintiff had booked a package to the Maldives with the defendant. The package included a transfer by floatplane from Malé to the island where the hotel was situated. Accorsing to the Operating Manual of the carrier, it is necessary to moor the floatplane with three ropes. The crew is required to stand at each side of the entrance in order to assist the passengers boarding the aircraft. When the plaintiff was about to board, despite some waves the floatplane was only moored with two ropes and only one member of the crew was standing next to the entrance.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Swiss Federal Court: tour organizer not liable for paraglider accident

The plaintiff who had had successfully completed his paragliding education in 2001,  in 2002 booked a paragliding package to Italy with defendant. After some flights with a paraglider classified as being of "good-natured" flight characteristics, he changed to a more demanding paraglider classified for experienced pilots. At the second attempt with this other paraglider, it collapsed at one side which led into a crash in which the plaintiff was severely injured.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

U.S. Supreme Court refuses to hear appeal in West Caribbean Airways crash case

On Dec. 9, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court has denied a request to review an Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that affirmed the order of a Florida federal court refusing to vacate its November 2007 dismissal of a wrongful-death and strict-liability suit on forum non conveniens grounds. The heirs to victims of a 2005 West Caribbean Airways crash in Venezuela during a flight from Panama to Martinique had claimed that their suit against the air carrier was improperly dismissed because it left them without a forum to litigate the case.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Austrian Supreme Court: hotelier liable for legionella disease

In April 2003, the plaintiff stayed at the defendant's hotel. When using the shower she caught a legionella infection which led into a pneumonia. The reason for the contamination of the bathing water was an insufficient circulation speed which made the water cool down to a temperature that stimulated the reprduction of legionella bacteria. Up to (at least) March 2003, the hotelier had engaged a plumber to take care of the maintenance of the water pipe system.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Canada: Ontario Superior Court of Justice decides on Montreal Convention exclusivity

On January 14, 2011, Ashlyn O’Hara was a passenger on Air Canada Flight AC878  from Toronto to Zurich. During the flight, the First Officer went to sleep for approximately  75 minutes. When the First Officer awoke, the Captain informed him that a United States Air Force Boeing C-17 had appeared as a traffic alert and collision avoidance system target on the flight’s navigational display. The Captain apprised the First Officer of this traffic.

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